Lecture Videos and Newsletters

 

Watch SYMPOSIUM LECTURES, other EVENT LECTURES  (you need to scroll down for the Urrea / Filisola mock trial and the event lectures) or read past newsletters.   The links to the videos become active as they are uploaded.  As of 1 October, 2014 there are 59individual videos to select from.  Ultimately all the presentations from all of the Symposiums will be available.  Click on the lecture title to watch the video. When you have finished watching just click the back button in your browser and you will return to this website.  Click on the SYMPOSIUM title to see the original program.

 

2001 - New Perspectives from the Mexican Side  

Welcome to the Symposium.  Jeff Dunn, Chairman, San Jacinto Historical Advisory Board

Greetings from the University of Houston.  W. Andrew Achenbaum, Professor of History, University of Houston

Why this Symposium is important.  Bill Dolman, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

Importance of the Museum and the Battleground.  George Donnelly, President San Jacinto Museum Historical Assoc.

The Historical Context of this Symposium.  Jeff Dunn, Chairman, San Jacinto Historical Advisory Board

The Mexican Retreat after San Jacinto - Military Concerns or Speculative Consideration?  Miguel Soto, Professor of  History, Universidad Natl Autonoma de Mexico

When did Mexico lose Texas?  The quest for the irreversible moment.  James E. Crisp, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History, North Carolina State University.  (Please note that this lecture is continued - next item in the list.)

When did Mexico lose Texas  CONTINUED.

Tracking the Mexican Army through the Sea of Mud.  Gregg Dimmick, M.D.

Hollywood Portrayal of the Battle of San Jacinto.  Frank Thompson, Film maker and historian.

 

2002 - Personalities of San Jacinto  

Sam Houston & San Jacinto:  It wasn't supposed to happen this way.   Jim Haley, author.

Houston's Generalship, The Method, The Meeting and The Myth.   Dr. Stephen L. Hardin, Professor of History, The Victoria College

Santa Anna.  Dr. Josefina Vasquez, Professor of History, El Colegio de Mexico.

Sidney Sherman   .  Gerard Kendall, San Jacinto Chapter, Sons of the Republic of Texas.

Juan Seguin and the Tejano Company.  Dr. Jesus F. de la Teja, Professor of History,  Southwest Texas State University.

San Jacinto:  Who Wears the Coat of Many Colors?    J.P. Bryan, Past President, Texas State Historical Association.

 

 

2003 - San Jacinto:  A Chapter in U.S.  -  Mexico Relations

 

Welcome & Symposium Introduction.  Dr. Jim Crisp, Associate Professor of History, North Carolina State University.

San Jacinto:  The Turning Point of the Texan-Mexican War.   Dr. R. Bruce Winders, Historian and Curator of the Alamo

Irreparable Damage?  The Texas Rebellion in US and Mexico Relations.  Raul A. Ramos, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History, University of Houston.

Questions and Answer Session.   Dr. Crisp, Dr. Winders and Dr. Ramos.

Archeology from El Mar de Lodo,.  Dr. Gregg Dimmick

Introduction to the afternoon session with Ms. Roberts and Dr. Campbell.  Moderator, Dr. James E. Crisp

Sam Houston's Road to San Jacinto.  Mrs. Madge Thornall Roberts, author and great-granddaughter of Sam Houston.

Slavery in the Texas Revolution.  Dr. Randolph (Mike) Campbell, Professor of History, University of North Texas.

 

 

2004 - Digging for Texas History:  New Insights into the Battle & Origins of the Texas Revolution

 

Welcome:  Jeff Dunn, Chairman, San Jacinto Historical Advisory Board

The Master Plan for the Battleground and information on archeological studies and the marsh restoration project.  Jim Burton, Senior Project Manager, Infrastructure Division, Texas Parks & Wildlife Department

Restoring the Environment of a Battle.  Ted Hollingsworth, Senior Project Manager, Land Conservation, Texas Parks & Wildlife Department

Archeology at San Jacinto and the Latest Findings.  Michael Strutt, Director of Cultural Resources, Texas Parks & Wildlife Department

Panel Discussion.  Jeff Dunn, Jim Burton, Michael Strutt, Roger Moore & Ted Hollingsworth.

Welcome to the afternoon session.  Jeff Dunn, Chairman, San Jacinto Historical Advisory Board

Introductory Remarks for the Afternoon Session.  James E. Crisp, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History, North Carolina State University

Anglo Texans and the Road to Revolution.  Gregg Cantrell, Ph.D., Professor of History, Texas Christian University

The Tejano Side of the Texas Revolution.  Andrés Tijerina, Ph.D., Professor of History, Austin Community College.

"Their Audacity is Now Intolerable':  Col. Juan N. Almonte and the Texas Revolution." John Wheat, Center for American History, University of Texas.

Speaker's Forum.  Gregg Cantrell, Ph.D., Andrés Tijerina, Ph.D., John Wheat and Jack E. Jackson.  Moderated by James E. Crisp, Ph.D.

 

2005 - Conflicting Loyalties, New Orleans, US Army and the Final Days of The Revolution

Welcome.  Jan DeVault, San Jacinto Historical Advisory Board

Introduction.  James E. Crisp, Ph.D.  North Carolina State University

From the Brazos to the Battle:  The Final Days of the San Jacinto Campaign.  Jeffrey D. Dunn, Chairman, San Jacinto Historical Advisory Board.

Bayonets on the Bayou?  The United States Army and the Battle of San Jacinto.  Bill and Marjorie K. Walraven, Texas history journalists.

Questions and Answers

Archeology at the San Jacinto Battleground.  Michael Strutt, Director of Cultural Resources, Texas Parks and Wildlife.

Documenting the Texas Revolution:  Resources in the University of Texas at Arlington Special Collections.  Ann E. Hodges and Brenda S. McClurkin, Archivists.

Conflicting Loyalties:  Tejanos as Rebels and Loyalists.  A. Carolina Castillo Crimm, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History, Sam Houston State University.

The San Jacinto-New Orleans Connection:  The New Orleans Greys, Tampico, and General Cos' Saddle.  Edward L. Miller, Author of New Orleans and the Texas Revolution, 2004 Winner, Summerfield G. Roberts Award.

Speakers' Forum.  Moderated by James E. Crisp, Ph.D. with Jeffrey D. Dunn, Bill and Majorie K. Walraven, A. Carolina Castillo Crimm, Edward L. Miller.

2006 Symposium - Individuals, Ships & East Texas during the Revolution

Before Texas:  Genesis of Santa Anna's Career as a Pamphlateer  .  Dr. Felix D. Alamaraz, Jr., Peter T. Flawn Distinguished Professor of Borderlands History, University of Texas at San Antonio.

The Revolutions Wooden Walls:  The Texas Navy in the Struggle of Independence.   Jonathan Jordan, Attorney.

A Ship of Titles:  Searching for the Wreck of Moctezuma   -  Jerry Drake, Director of Archives and Records, Texas General Land Office

The Texas Revolution in East Texas.  Dr. Archie P. McDonald, Regents Professor of History, Stephen F. Austin State Univ..

Who Were the Texans of 1836?  Dr. Andres Resendez, Associate Professor of History, University of California at Davis.

Question and Answer Session    Dr. Crisp moderates.  2006 Symposium speakers answer written questions from the audience.

 

 

2007 - Contending Factions Within the Texas Revolution

 

Welcome and Open Remarks.  Dr. James E. Crisp, Associate Professor of History, North Carolina State University.

Hell for Women and Oxen?  Women in the Conflicts of the Revolution and Republic.  Paula Mitchell Marks, Ph.D., Director, Master of Liberal Arts Program, St. Edwards University.

Vince's Bridge:  Why Are They Trying to Move It?  C. David Pomeroy, Jr., Historian and Author.

The Texas Revolution and Annexation Re-considered:  Revisiting the Abolitionist Thesis.  Fred L. McGhee, Ph.D., Maritime Archaeologist and Historical Anthropologist. 

Taking a Hard Look at the Past and Introductory Remarks for the Afternoon Session.  Dr. James E. Crisp, Associate Professor of History, North Carolina State University.

Texas Rangers in the San Jacinto Campaign.  Stephen L. Moore, Historian and Author.

American Indians and the Texas Revolution.  Gary Clayton Anderson, Ph.D., Professor of History, University of Oklahoma.

 

 

2008 Expanding the Horizons of Texas History

 

Welcome to the Symposium.  Jeff Dunn, Co-founder, Battle of San Jacinto Symposium.

Remarks.  Sylvia Garcia, Harris County Commissioner, Precinct 2

Introduction to the SymposiumDr. James E. Crisp, Symposium Moderator.

Historical Fact, Historical Fiction:  Early Texas Through a Novelist's Eyes.  There is a Q & A session immediately following his presentation.  Stephen Harrigan, Michener Center for Writers, University of Texas.

Commonality & Conflict:  Northeast Mexico and the Texas Revolution and RepublicMiguel Ángel González-Quiroga, Professor of History, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo León.

The Secret War for Texas: James Grant's Alternative RevolutionStuart Reid, Author, Military Historian.

An interview with Malcolm D. McLean, Ph.D., Compiler of the Robertson Colony Papers, taped by Matthew & Co.  Georgetown.

Making History Personal.  Betsy Davis, 4th Grade Teacher, Mathews Elementary School, Austin.

Exploring the Texas Revolution Online Through the Portal to Texas History.  Dreanna Belden, Librarian, Portal to Texas History, University of North Texas.

Questions and Answers.  Moderated by Dr. Crisp.

 

2009 Symposium - New Light On Old Stories

 

Welcome.  Jeff Dunn, JD, Vice President & Director of The San Jacinto Battleground Assoication

Welcome.  Sylvia Garcia, Harris County Commissioner

Possible Alamo Cannon.  Gregg Dimmick, M.D., Chairman of the San Jacinto Battleground Conservancy Archeology Committee

Welcome from the Symposium Moderator.  James E. Crisp, Ph.D.  Associate Professor of History, North Carolina State University.

What was Houston Thinking? San Jacinto and the Strategy of the Texas Revolution.  Dr. H.W. Brands, Dickson Allen Anderson Centennial Professor of History, University of Texas at Austin.

Heirs to a Revolution:  Looking for the Spirit of '76 in the Anglo-American Struggle Against Mexico, 1835-1836.   Dr. Sam W. Haynes, Associate Professor of History, University of Texas at Arlington.

Financing the Texas Revolution.   James P. Bevill, UBS Financial Advisor and author of Paper Republic:  The Struggle for Money, Credit and Independence in the Republic of Texas.

Latest Archeological Discoveries at and Near San Jacinto Battleground.  Panelists Introduction by Dr. Crisp.  ( please note that the comments by Douglas Mangum follow his introduction - or you can click on Douglas name below to go directly to him)

Douglas Mangum  GIS Manager, Moore Archeological Consulting of Houston.

Gregg Dimmick, M.D  ., Pediatrician, South Texas Medical Clinics, Wharton, Texas.  Chairman of the San Jacinto Battleground Conservancy Archeology Committee.

Manuel Hinojosa  , Architect and authority on the 19th century Mexican Army.

Michael Strutt  , Director of Cultural Resources, Texas Parks & Wildlife Department, Austin, Texas

Roger G. Moore, Ph.D., R.P.A  .,  Founder and president, Moore Archeological Consulting, Inc., Houston, and manager of the San Jacinto project for the San Jacinto Battleground Conservancy.  NOTE:  At this end of his talk you will find a question and answer session for this panel and the other speakers.

 

 

2010 Skulls, Slaves, and Sex:  Secrets of Early Texas

 

Welcome - Jan DeVault, President, San Jacinto Battleground Conservancy

Introduction - Dr. Jim Crisp, Symposium Moderator

The Mexican Dead at San Jacinto.  Jeffrey D. Dunn, Vice President, San Jacinto Battleground Conservancy.

Audubon's Trip to Texas in 1837.  Ron Tyler, Ph.D., Director, Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth.

Crania Injuries in Mexican Soldiers at San Jacinto.  Douglas Owsley, Ph.D., Smithsonian Institution, Museum of Natural History.

The Slaveholder's Republic.  Andrew J. Torget, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History, University of North Texas.

Sam Houston and San Jacinto.  Hon. William P. Hobby, Jr., Lieutenant Governor of Texas 1973-1991.  Unfortunately this luncheon speech was not video taped but his lecture is available in print.  Just click on the title and it will come on your screen.

Tejano Leadership in Mexican and Revolutionary Texas.  Jesús F. de la Teja, Ph.D., Former Texas State Historian, Professor of History, Texas State University.

Was Sam a Bigamist?  A Lawyer Looks at Sam Houston's Divorce.  James W. Paulsen, Professor of Law, South Texas College of Law.

Revolutionary Sex:  Texas' Philandering Founders.  Lael Morgan, Lecturer at the Dept. of Communications, University of Texas at Arlington.

Question & Answers.  Moderated by Dr. Crisp.

2011 Symposium - The Legacy of San Jacinto.

The speakers explored the legacy of the Battle of San Jacinto on the history of the United States, Mexico, Texas, and culture through art.

The Battle's Impact on the United States   .  Daniel Walker Howe, Ph.D., Professor of American History Emeritus at Oxford University and Professor of History Emeritus at the University of California in Los Angeles.

The Battle's Impact on Texas.  Ty Cashion, Ph.D., Professor of History at Sam Houston State University.

Alamo Artillery:  Ampudia and a Real Cannon.   Gregg Dimmick, M.D., Chairman of the San Jacinto Battleground Conservancy Archeology Committee.    (Note: The cannon discussed in this lecture is now on display in the Alamo.)  

The Battle's Impact on Mexico  .  Hon. Romeo Ricardo Flores Caballero a noted authority on the American-Mexican frontier, Director of the State Archives of Nuevo León in Monterrey, a former member of the Mexican Congress, and former Consul General of Mexico in Los Angeles.

The Battle's Cultural Legacy Through its Depiction in Art  .  Sam Deshong Ratcliffe, Ph.D., the Head of the Bywaters Special Collections at the Hamon Arts Library at Southern Methodist University.  This video begins with a 27 minute presentation by Jan DeVault, the president of The San Jacinto Battleground Conservancy.  Her topic is Battleground Preservation.

 

2012 Symposium - Linking the Present to the Past:  Preserving A Great Texas Battlefield

In 1998, the Texas Parks & Wildlife Commission adopted the goal of restoring San Jacinto Battleground to its 1836 appearance. Why is that goal important and relevant? What progress has been made? Why should we preserve historic battlegrounds such as San Jacinto? What have archeologists dug up over the past 15 years? What challenges do we face?

Historic preservation at the Alamo and San Jacinto   Paul Andrew Hutton, Ph.D., Professor of History, University of New Mexico. (Video begins with symposium welcome by Jan DeVault and introduction by Dr. James Crisp. Lecture begins at 0:30:08

Sacred Ground - A history of San Jacinto Battleground    Jeffrey D. Dunn, Attorney

Modern Preservation Principles for Battlefields of National Importance   Kristen L. McMasters, M.A.  Archeologist and Grants Manager, American Battlefield Protection Program, National Park Service.

Preservation at TPWD: Our Parks, Challenges & Projects    Michael Strutt, Cultural Resources Program Director, TPWD

San Jacinto Archeology: Past, Present and Future    Douglas Mangum, M.A.  GIS Manager, Moore Archeological Consulting of Houston (a Q&A session begins at 1:20:07

 

2013 Symposium - Wars, Treaties and Boundaries - A Look at the Shape of Texas

The 13th annual Battle of San Jacinto Symposium examines how the eastern boundary of Texas established by the Adams-Onis Treaty of 1819 influenced settlement in Texas -- and ultimately the separation of Texas from Mexico during the Texas Revolution - - and how the 1836 battle of San Jacinto influenced the establishment of the Rio Grande as the western Texas boundary followed by the loss of claims to eastern New Mexico in 1850. These presentations from preeminent historians from the United States, Texas and Mexico discuss the latest scholarship and divergent perspectives on how wars, treaties, controversies, and compromises from 1819 to 1850 resulted in the modern borders of this uniquely shaped piece of real estate we call Texas

On the eastern and northern boundaries of Texas    Gene Allen Smith, PhD, professor of history and director of Texas studies at Texas Christian University, and curator of history at the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History.  This lecture ends at 0.51.37 minutes on the video counter. 

A Mexican perspective on the border between Mexico and Texas.  Manuel González Oropeza, PhD, professor and supervisor of the Graduate Division in the School of Law at the Universidad Nacional Autonóma de México (UNAM) in Mexico City and has been a judge of the Mexican Supreme Court for Elections since 2006. This lecture ends at 1:39.00 and a question and answer session begins.  This video begins with the introduction of Dr. Jim Crisp our moderator who in turn introduces the speakers.  After the lectures our moderator Dr. Jim Crisp hosts a question and answer session for Dr. Smith and Dr. Oropeza.

On the Rio Grande boundary of Texas   Jerry Thompson, Ph.D., Professor of History at Texas A&M International University

On the Northwestern boundary and the Compromise of 1850.    Mark J. Stegmaier, Ph.D., Professor of history at Cameron University. (a Q&A begins at 1:00:37)

 

 

2014 Symposium - The Tejano Side of the Texas Revolution

Texas Senate Proclamation 641 recognizing 2014 Symposium - 2 Pages - Click Here

 WelcomeJan DeVault, President, San Jacinto Battleground Conservancy

Special Presentation.  Sylvia Garcia, Texas State Senator

The Battle of San Jacinto.  Jeff Dunn, Advisory Director, San Jacinto Battleground Conservancy

Jim Crisp, Ph.D.  Symposium Moderator

San Antonio Tejanos.  Raúl Ramos, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History, University of Houston

East Texas Tejanos.  Francis X. Galán, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History, Texas A&M University - San Antonio.

Goliad - Victoria Tejanos.  Graig H. Roell, Ph.D., Wells/Warren Professor of History, Georgia Southern University.

Antonio Menchaca at San JacintoJesùs F. de la Teja, Ph.D., Supple Professor, Director, Center for the Study of the Southwest, Texas State University.

The Revolution and the Lower Valley.  Omar S. ValerioJimnez, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History, University of Iowa.

Seguin and the Texas Revolution in Public Memory.  James E. Crisp, Ph.D., Professor of History, North Carolina State University.

 

 

Event Lectures:

 

Mock Debate:  General Jose de Urrea vs. General Vicente Filisola.  Manual Hinojosa (Urrea) and Gregg Dimmick (Filisola) met in a mock trial.  The trial judge was portrayed by John Wheat.  The members of the audience acted as the jury to see which General made the best case.  They each ask questions of each other.  This obviously UN-REHEARSED event is fun, entertaining and a pretty good learning experience.

Sam, Santa Anna and who?    The Battle of San Jacinto and the individuals involved presented by students at Deer Park Junior High School in Deer Park Texas. Published October 17, 2013.

Who Was Bernardo de Galvez    Dr. Caroline Castillo Crimm, retired Associate Professor of History from Sam Houston State University.  This lecture was presented February 11, 2014 at the Pioneer Memorial Log House Museum in Houston Texas.

 

Past Newsletters:

Vol. 1 issue 1     March 2012

Vol  1 issue 2     October 2012

 

Future Issues will appear when published

 

Why not take a moment to become a member of the San Jacinto Battleground Conservancy

Click here for more information